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ABRASION
ACCOMMODATION
ACUITY
AMBLYOPIA
.
AMETROPIA
.
ANISOMETROPIA
APHAKIA
ASTIGMATISM
.
BINOCULAR VISION
BLEPHARITIS
BLINDNESS
.
BLIND SPOT
CATARACT
CHALAZION
CONVERGENCE
CYLINDRICAL LENS
DIOPTER
DIPLOPIA
EDEMA
A break in the epithelial of the cornea
Ability to change focus from objects far to objects near
Sharpness of vision.
Less than standard visual acuity with the best lens correction available, without obvious structural or pathological
defects.
The refractive condition in which, with accommodation relaxed, parallel rays do not focus

on the retina. Represents myopia, hypermetropia, or astigmatism.
A condition of unequal refractive state for the two eyes with different lens correction required for each eye
Condition where the lens of the eye has been removed.
Refractive error, which prevents the light, rays from a spot from coming to a single focus on the retina, because of

different refraction in different meridians of that eye.
Vision in which both eyes contribute toward producing a single percept.
Any inflammation of the eyelid, but commonly referring to the margin.
The inability to see. Absence or severe reduction of vision. Legal definition. Central vision 20/200 or less with best

correction, or field defect with the widest field diameter of an angle no greater than 20 degrees.
An area in the field of vision where sight is absent due to the absence of nerve endings in the optic disc.
Condition in which the lens in the eye loses its transparency.
A swollen meibonian gland.
The process of directing the two eyes to the same near point.
A lens used in the correction of astigmatism.
A unit used to designate the refractive power of a lens or an optical system.
Double vision.
Swelling

BINOCULAR VISION
BLEPHARITIS
BLINDNESS .

Vision in which both eyes contribute toward producing a single percept.
Any inflammation of the eyelid, but commonly referring to the margin.
The inability to see. Absence or severe reduction of vision. Legal definition. Central vision 20/200 or less with best

correction, or field defect with the widest field diameter of an angle no greater than 20 degrees.

BLIND SPOT
CATARACT
CHALAZION
CONVERGENCE
CYLINDRICAL LENS
DIOPTER
DIPLOPIA
EDEMA
EMMETROPIA
ESOTROPIA
EXOTROPIA
FIELD OF VISION

An area in the field of vision where sight is absent due to the absence of nerve endings in the optic disc.
Condition in which the lens in the eye loses its transparency.
A swollen meibonian gland.
The process of directing the two eyes to the same near point.
A lens used in the correction of astigmatism.
A unit used to designate the refractive power of a lens or an optical system.
Double vision.
Swelling
The refractive status of the eye is zero. No correction is necessary.
When one eye looks at an object, the other eye turns in. Commonly called cross-eyes or strabismus.
When one eye looks at an object, the other eye turns out. Commonly called wall-eyed or strabismus.
The area or extent of physical space visible to an eye in a given position. Its average extent is approximately

65 degrees upward, 75 degrees downward, 60 degrees inward and 95 degrees outward. When the eye is in the straight forward position.

FLOATERS
.
.
.FUSION

In the normally transparent vitreous, deposits of varying size, shape, consistency, refractive index, and motility, which may be of embryonic origin or acquired are found. If acquired, they may be an indication of changes degenerative of the retina or the vitreous humor. The patient "sees" these as projected floating spots in space.
The coordination of both eyes on the same object to form one image.

GLAUCOMA
.
HYPEROPIA
HYPERPHORIA
.
INJECTION
.
IRIS
.
KERATOCONUS
.
LACRIMATION
LIMBUS
MACULA LUTEA..

An ocular disease, occurring in many forms. Having as its primary characteristics an unstable or a sustained increase in the intraocular pressure resulting in blindness atrophy of the retina, cupping of the optical disc.
Farsightedness
The upward deviation, or the amount of upward deviation of the line of sight of one eye with reference to that of the other eye, as manifested in the absence of an adequate fusion stimulus or when fusion is made impossible.
Increased redness of an area due to dilation and engorgement of the mall blood vessels of the region, e. g. in conjunctivitis.
The colored portion viewed through the cornea with an opening in the center called the PUPIL. Muscular in nature, the iris regulates pupil size by contracting or expanding.
A degenerative, non-inflammatory disease of the cornea. The cornea is cone shaped and high myopia and irregular astigmatism usually accompany the condition. Contact lenses may aid in curtailing this disease.
Tearing
Boundary between the clear and white coatings of the eyeball; that is where the cornea merges into the sclera.
The most sensitive area of vision used for reading or looking at minute details or any other task requiring concentration and attention. Normally when you look at something, the macula is directed toward the object of fixation. This area has a great concentration of cones.

MONOCULAR
MYOPIA
NYSTAGMUS
OCCLUDER
OPHTHALMOSCOPE
OPTIC DISC
.
OPTIC NERVE
.
PERIPHERAL VISION
PHORIA
PHOROPTER
PHOTOPHOBIA
PRESBYOPIA
PRISM

Pertaining to one eye.
Nearsightedness
Involuntary movement of the eye.
An opaque or translucent device placed before an eye to obscure or block vision.
An instrument for viewing the fundus and the interior of the eye.
The place where the optic nerve and some of the blood vessels enter the eye is called the optic disc. No rods or cones are present, hence this produces a blind spot.
Connecting the retina to the brain is the optic nerve. Stimulation of the retinal nerve ending are carried to the brain through the optic nerve.
Vision resulting from stimulation of the retina exclusive of the fovea or the macula.
The pointing angle of the two eyes when binocular vision is prevented.
An instrument for determining the refractive state of the eye.
An abnormal intolerance or fear of light.
A gradual lessening of ability to focus at near resulting in difficulty of seeing near objects, i. e. reading.
An optical element which deviates the path of light towards the base of the prism. A displaced image is seen through a prism is viewed in a different place than the object, but appears the same size and at the same distance as the real object.

PUPIL
.
.
REFRACTION
.
.
RETINA

The central opening in the iris which appears black to the observer. The pupil may be expanded or contracted by the action of the iris. By shining a light into the pupil with an instrument called the ophthalmoscope the inside of the eye can be seen.
(1) The altering of the pathway of light from its original direction as a result of passing obliquely from one medium to another of different index of refraction. (2) The refractive and muscular state of the eyes, or the act or process of determining and/or correcting it.
A membrane containing rods and cones (nerve elements) lining the inner portion of the eye and connected to the brain through the optic nerve. Light stimuli generate nerve impulses, which the brain then translates into color, shapes, and detail.

RETINOSCOPE
STRABISMUS
.
SUPPRESSION
TANGENT SCREEN
.
TENSION
TONOMETER
.
TUNNEL VISION
ULCER, CORNEAL
VISUAL ACUITY
.
VISUAL, AXIS

An instrument used for determining the refractive state of the eye.
The condition in which binocular fixation is not present under normal seeing conditions, i. e., the line of sight of one eye fails to intersect the object of fixation. Also commonly referred to as "crossed eyes" or "wall eyes".
When the brain disregards an image from one eye.
A large plane surface of black cloth used for plotting the physiological blind spot, scotoma, or fixational field restrictions.
(intraocular) The pressure within the eyeball.
An instrument for measuring the tunics (membranes) of the eye, the impressibility depending on the tension of the tunics which in turn depends on the intraocular pressure.
Loss of the peripheral field of vision giving the individual the impression of looking through a tunnel.
A lesion in the corneal tissue.
Acuteness or clearness of vision (especially of form vision) which depends on the sharpness of the retinal, focus, the sensitivity of the nervous elements, and the interpretative faculty of the brain.
Imaginary line from an object of view through the center of the pupil to the macula.


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